Gigantic List of Plants and Flowers that Attract Hummingbirds

hummingbird flying feeding

By Erin Marissa Russell

Want to attract hummingbirds to your yard without messy feeders? One of the biggest thrills a gardener can experience is spotting a hummingbird flitting among the blooms of your plants. It’s easy to experience this thrill more frequently by planting the flowers hummingbirds love to feed on so they’ll visit your garden more frequently. If your garden is a hummingbird’s dream buffet, you may begin to have daily visitors. Some gardeners are even able to feed hummingbirds by hand once they’re accustomed to both the garden and the gardener’s presence. With so many flowers that attract hummingbirds, you’re sure to find plenty that will fit into your garden plans.

Allegheny Monkeyflower (Mimulus ringens)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall; 8 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: June through September

The blossoms of the Allegheny monkeyflower resemble miniature irises in shades of purple from pale lavender to violet with a smear of buttery yellow at the center. Plant in full sun or partial shade in moist or even completely wet soil. The monkeyflower works well as a water plant or an addition to a rain garden. It’s a low maintenance plant that tolerates deer, doesn’t struggle with pests or diseases, and will self-seed while simultaneously spreading underground via rhizomes.


Anise Sage (Salvia guaranitica)

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 10

Size: 2 to 5 feet wide; 2 to 5 feet tall

Bloom Time: July through winter’s first frost

Royal blue or deep purple blooms that fade to black where they attach to the stem are stacked atop one another on the stems of the anise sage plant. Plant in partial shade or full sun in average soil (anise sage prefers a rich loam) that has good drainage. If plants get too much shade, they’ll stretch out, growing leggy and spindly before collapsing. Anise sage tolerates deer and is a low maintenance plant that rarely struggles with insect infestations or disease, but occasionally gardeners may encounter powdery mildew or downy mildew.


Asiatic Lily/Golden-Rayed Lily (Lilium auratum)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 8

Size: 2 to 5 feet tall; 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: July and August

White lilies have a sunny yellow stripe down each petal and are freckled with rust-colored spots that match the anthers. Plant Asiatic lilies where they’ll get full sun or in partial shade, preferably in a rich, loamy soil with good drainage. (The best setup is for the roots to get shade and the top of the plant to stretch into the sun.) While Asiatic lilies don’t normally have problems with disease, when they do, they are likely to encounter lily mosaic virus, bulb rot, and Botrytis blight. Ensure good drainage and control aphids to reduce the chance of disease.


Aster (Symphyotrichum)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8

Size: 1 to 6 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late summer through fall

There are 90 different varieties of asters for gardeners to choose from, and hummingbirds love them all. Most of the asters bloom in shades of white, pink, rose, lavender, or blue-purple, with daisy-like flowers that have pointed tips on their petals. Plant asters where they’ll get plenty of sunshine. They’ll flourish in just about any soil type: rocky, clay, dry, sandy, or shallow. However, asters prefer moist, rich soil that drains well. Asters are generally healthy plants but may struggle with aster wilt and powdery mildew.


Beardtongue (Penstemon)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 6 inches to 8 feet tall, depending on variety; 8 to 20 inches wide

Bloom Time: End of spring through early summer

Penstemon’s tubular blossoms come in jewel-like shades of indigo, lavender, coral, pink, red, fuchsia, blue, white, wine, and even some two-toned options. The flowers are stacked on spires, and depending on variety, they can grow to seriously impressive heights. There’s quite a range of care preferences, so most gardeners should be able to find a penstemon variety that suits the soil and sun available in their garden.


Bee Balm (Monarda)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 2 to 4 feet tall; 2 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late summer

The most common shades of bee balm you’ll find put out their feathery blooms in shades of pink and red. Since hummingbirds flock to red flowers, choose a red bee balm for maximum attraction. Plant in full sun to partial shade in a spot where the soil is moist but drains well. Bee balm isn’t picky about soil type and will flourish in chalky, clay, loam, or sandy soils whether they’re acidic, alkaline, or neutral. They also tolerate deer and rabbits as well as growing under black walnut trees. Choose a spot with plenty of air circulation to avoid the powdery mildew that can plague these plants.


Begonia (Begonia x semperflorens-cultorum)

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 11

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall; 6 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: Beginning of summer to first frost

These garden classics are available in just about every color of the rainbow, but for maximum hummingbird action, go for a red hue. They’ll thrive in sun, partial shade, or shade, making them versatile little plants, but they do best in slightly shady spots. Provide begonias with plenty of drainage and generous hydrations and fertilizer, and you’ll be amazed how many blossoms you’ll see—and how long the blooming season lasts. The glossy foliage of begonias provides gorgeous contrast to the clusters of blooms. Water deeply, but let the soil dry out somewhat between watering sessions, as too much hydration will kill begonia plants.


Bellflower/Canterbury Bells (Campanula)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 4 inches to 3 feet tall; 6 inches to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

The most common bellflowers blossom in a bluish purple shade that’s similar to hyacinths, but some varieties are a paler lavender, pink, or white. The bell-shaped flowers are perfect for cut flower arrangements. Choose a location with soil that drains well and gets plenty of sunshine. A few of the alpine varieties will tolerate partial shade, but for maximum blooms (and maximum hummingbird bait), the plants will need all the sunshine you can give them. Bellflowers multiply by spreading seed above ground and multiplying their rhizomes underground. In fact, they’re so enthusiastic that they’re considered invasive in some areas, so you may wish to contain them in a plant pot or raised bed.


Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9

Size: 2 to 3 feet tall; 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to early fall

Black-eyed Susans are a wildflower from the central U.S. that resembles the daisy, but with sunny yellow petals that surround a black center. The best location for black-eyed Susans is in full sun, planted in a moist soil that drains well and is rich with organic material. These sturdy flowers will tolerate most soil types, though, unless they have poor drainage, and they’ll even stand up to drought or hot weather. Black-eyed Susans will seed themselves to come back year after year. 


Blazing Star (Liatris)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 1 to 5 feet tall, depending on variety; 8 inches to 1.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late summer

Liatris is a dramatic choice in the garden, with spiky vertical spires that erupt into feathery blooms in white, lavender, blue-purple, or violet. As wildflowers, liatris will adapt to a variety of conditions, but it thrives best in full sun with average soil that drains well. However, the flowers will tolerate some shade, poor soil, moist (but not wet) soil, rocky soil, clay soil, and even drought. Liatris is a generally healthy, low maintenance plant, although it sometimes requires staking when blooms get top-heavy.


Bleeding Heart (Lamprocapnos)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 2 to 3 feet tall; 1.5 to 2.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: April through May

Bleeding heart is one of the prettiest flowers you can grow, and it’s a unique choice as these plants are a bit old-fashioned. The branches drip with jewel-like heart-shaped deep pink flowers, each with a drop of white petals emerging from the point. Pure white blooms are also an option. Plant in a shaded spot, either partially or fully shaded, with moist soil that gets plenty of drainage. Lack of drainage can spell disaster for these plants, but otherwise they’re unfussy, though they’ll occasionally need to fight off an aphid infestation.   


Bottlebrush/Little John (Callistemon)

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 11

Size: Reaches up to 15 feet tall and 8 feet wide

Bloom Time: Early spring through late summer

The bottlebrush plant is named because the blooms really do look like bright red bottlebrushes tipping the branches. You can find them in white or pink instead of the classic red, but hummingbirds really hone in on red flowers. Find a spot in the garden for bottlebrushes that gets full sunlight and has a moist, loamy soil that offers plenty of drainage. These plants are quite self-sufficient, and once they’re established, will only need watering during drought and a bit of pruning now and again. As long as overwatering is avoided, bottlebrushes shouldn’t have to contend with diseases.


Bugleweed (Ajuga reptans)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 10

Size: 6 to 9 inches tall; 6 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: May and June

The indigo blooms of bugleweed resemble an enlarged version of bluebonnets. Plant in partial shade or full sun, preferably in a humusy soil that’s moist but offers good drainage. Bugleweed will tolerate moderately dry soil, however, as well as full shade. For the prettiest foliage and flowers, however, make sure bugleweed plants get at least three or four hours of sunshine each day. As bugleweed spreads, it will form an attractive groundcover for the garden. In very warm or humid climates, bountiful air circulation will be vital to prevent crown rot.


Butterfly Bush (Buddleja)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 11

Size: 1 to 20 feet tall; 1 to 18 feet wide (depending on variety)

Bloom Time: Summer

The butterfly bush comes with spires of blossoms in white, gold, or indigo, but the red and pink varieties will draw the most hummingbirds. These plants are known for their fruity aroma when in bloom. Provide butterfly bush with plenty of sunlight, and plant in moderately moist soil that drains well. Butterfly bush doesn’t suffer from many diseases, but in the southern U.S., nematodes ca be a problem.


Butterfly Weed/Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 10

Size: 1 to 2.5 feet tall; 1 to 1.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: June and August

Bushy foliage is topped with clusters of star-shaped blooms in flame orange and golden yellow. Plant butterfly weed where it will get plenty of sunshine, and it will grow happily in poor to average soil ranging from dry to moderately moist as long as it gets plenty of drainage. Avoid transplanting butterfly weed, and leave the seed pods on the plant if you want it to spread and multiply. Gardeners may face issues with leaf spot or rust, and in wet areas, crown rot can present a problem.  


California Fuchsia/Zauschneria (Epilobium canum)

USDA Growing Zones: 8b through 10

Size: 1 to 2 feet tall; 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: End of summer to beginning of fall

Bright orange-red trumpet-shaped blooms top lance-shaped velvety leaves of a grayish green hue on California fuchsia plants. This plant thrives in areas with full sun to partial shade, planted in chalky, loamy, or sandy soils whether they’re acidic, alkaline, or neutral—as long as there’s sufficient drainage. California fuchsia prefers lighter, sandy grit soils to heavier clay types. Gardeners rarely face pest or disease issues with these plants, but keep an eye out for the ever-present garden slugs when plants are young and tender.


Candy Corn Vine/Cigar Flower/Firecracker Vine (Manettia luteorubra)

USDA Growing Zones: 9 through 11

Size: 4 to 10 feet tall; 2 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Springtime through winter

The twining, evergreen candy corn vine blossoms into cute little tiny two-toned tube-shaped blooms that are a fiery red-orange tipped in bright yellow. The flowers really do look similar to the Halloween candy for which the plant is named. The candy corn vine’s blossoms have a unique fuzzy texture to match the plant’s soft, velvety grayish green leaves. Plant in full sun to partial shade, in a spot with average soil that offers good drainage. For added drama, plant this vine in a hanging basket or near a structure or fence that it can clamber over.


Canna Lily (Canna indica)

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 12

Size: 18 inches to 8 feet high; 18 inches to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time: Summer through fall

These tropical lilies offer high drama in the garden, stretching taller than a man at their highest. The broad leaves vary from deep jungle green to burgundy-purple, and the ruffled blooms range from a fiery, fluorescent red-orange through milder shades of peach and apricot to lemon yellow or creamy white. Some varieties have two-toned blossoms that are spotted and speckled like lilies or orchids. Plant these sun-loving lilies in rich, loamy soil that will provide them with plenty of moisture and also drain well. Watch out for slugs, snails, Japanese beetles, and canna leaf rollers (both moths and caterpillars) on the insect front. Canna lilies may also face aster yellows, canna mosaic virus, or rust fungus.


hummingbird feeding flower

Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 2 to 4 feet tall; 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: July through September 

Spires of flashy scarlet blooms are the most common shade of cardinal flowers you’ll find, and to attract hummingbirds, red will be more effective than the white or rosy pink varieties. These are easy flowers to cultivate in full sun or partial shade, planted in rich soil that’s moderately moist to wet. Cardinal flowers love moisture, so you mustn’t let them dry out, and they can even flourish through periods of flooding. In hot climates, you’ll want to opt for partial shade, as the flowers will need a respite from the sweltering sun in summertime. The only pests that will trouble cardinal flowers are slugs and snails. Don’t plant these near where children or pets can reach them, as they’re poisonous to humans and pets alike.


Catmint (Nepeta)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 2 to 3 feet tall; 2 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through early fall

Catmint is a very low-maintenance plant, making it a perfect choice for beginning gardeners who want to attract hummingbirds to their gardens. The bushy plants are topped with towers of blue-purple blooms with a very long blossoming season. The plants look similar to lavender at a distance. Catmint tolerates drought well and thrives in dry soils when planted in full sun or partial shade. Northern gardeners should find a sunny spot for these plants, while those in the south should offer catmint shade in the afternoon during the hot summer weather. The plants will not tolerate wet ground in the wintertime. Catmint is not troubled by pests or diseases and is a prolific self-seeder.


Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 9 (some varieties down to zone 3)

Size: 4 inches to 3 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: End of summer through fall

Chrysanthemums are an autumn garden standard, with a huge array of bloom types and colors, including white, cream, yellow, golden, rust orange, red, maroon, rose, lavender, and violet. Be advised that chrysanthemums are toxic to cats, dogs, and horses. Find your chrysanthemums a sunny spot with a rich humus soil that’s moist (slightly acidic when possible), and offers good drainage. Insects that can plague chrysanthemums include aphids, spider mites, and thrips, and they can face illnesses including aster yellows, Botrytis blight, leaf spot, powdery mildew, rust, stem and root rot, verticillium wilt, and viruses.


Clematis

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9

Size: 3 to more than 20 feet tall and wide

Bloom Time: Spring through fall (depending on variety)

Clematis is a perennial vine, with some types that bloom throughout the summer while others blossom all autumn long. The summer-blooming varieties have large, show-stopping blossoms as large as 7 inches wide, while those that bloom in the fall have smaller flowers densely packed with petals. Clematis vines are easy to care for, with most varieties thriving in full sun while some prefer partial shade. Those in sunny spots are happiest when their roots are shaded by another plant, so situate the base of your clematis vine near a neighbor so the roots will be cooled by the companion plant’s shadow. All varieties of clematis need good drainage and consistent hydration, but some types prefer drier soil than others and are more resistant to drought. Keep an eye out for greenflies, leaf miners, mildew, slime flux, vine weevils, whiteflies, and wilt.


Clove Pink/Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 1 to 1.5 feet tall; 9 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer

Clove pinks are also called carnations, and they’re a fixture in cut flower gardens and professional arrangements for their pretty ruffly petals and the wide array of colors they come in. You’ll find clove pinks in scarlet, magenta, pale pink, creamy yellow, white, apricot, lavender, and purple as well as two-toned varieties.


Columbine (Aquilegia)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall; 6 inches to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Middle of spring to beginning of summer

Columbines are some of the most varied and dramatic flowers you can grow, rewarding gardeners who grow them with a whole palette of colors to choose from. Not only are columbines colorful, they also offer tons of different flower shapes, with two-toned double blossoms, ruffly stacked varieties, smaller wild columbines that face downward, and even columbines with spidery, thin petals that stick far off the flower.


Coneflower (Echinacea)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 8 (some varieties down to zone 3)

Size: 1 to 4 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late spring to end of summer (though some varieties bloom until first frost)

Coneflowers are one of the few garden gems that really do thrive on such minimal care you can practically neglect them. Even better, there’s a coneflower to suit just about any taste, with an array of colors and your choice of single or double blooms, dwarf species, variegated coneflowers, and more.


Copper Iris (Iris fulva)

USDA Growing Zones: 6 through 9

Size: Generally 1 to 3 feet, though occasionally up to 5 feet tall; 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring to midsummer

The copper iris brings a blaze of color to the garden in shades of orange, red, copper, and rarely yellow blossoms. It’s native to swamps and marshlands, so copper iris is perfect for the wet spots where so many plants struggle. For more information, read Missouri Botanical Garden’s copper iris profile.


Coral Bells (Heuchera)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9 (some varieties up to zone 11)

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall; 6 inches to 2.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Coral bells aren’t just all about the blooms—for many varieties, the real showstopper is the vibrantly colored foliage. There are so many types to choose from, you’ll not only find the perfect shade, you’ll also be able to find a coral bells variety to flourish just about anywhere.


Coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus)

USDA Growing Zones: 2 through 7

Size: 2 to 5 feet tall; 4 to 8 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through midsummer

After the coralberry shrub’s pink or white blooms have faded, the shrub bursts into a second wave of color, with pink or purple berries to brighten the fall garden. This versatile plant will thrive in a variety of soil types and sun conditions, too. For more information, read Missouri Botanical Garden’s coralberry profile [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=f730].


Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea)

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 11

Size: 2 to 16 feet tall; 3 to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time: Peaks late winter through spring, but blooms year round

Coral bean offers ivy-like foliage, scarlet flowers that resemble yucca, and black seed pods with bright red seeds inside. Be advised that the plant is poisonous to humans and animals alike, so don’t plant near where children or pets play. For more information, read the profile from North Carolina State University’s Extension [https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/erythrina-herbacea/].


Cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus)

USDA Growing Zones: 2 through 11

Size: 1 to 6 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to first frost

Cosmos is a garden standard, with cheery blooms in red, purple, pink, or white atop tall stems. In addition to enticing hummingbirds to visit, cosmos also makes an excellent cut flower for arrangements.


Crabapple Tree (Malus)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8 (Siberian crabapple down to zone 2)

Size: 8 to 25 feet tall; 10 to 25 feet wide

Bloom Time: Springtime

There are 1,000 varieties of crabapple tree to choose from, with 100 considered common, and they bloom in shades of pink, red, and white. Crabapples are distinguished from apple trees by the size of the fruit, which in crabapples is 2 inches wide or less.


Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica)

USDA Growing Zones: 7 through 10

Size: 3 to 30 feet tall; 6 to 20 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to early fall

Crepe myrtles are incredibly popular for good reason. You’ll find varieties that bloom in pink, purple, red, peach, cream, and white, and in winter the bark will peel for added visual appeal.


Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 9 

Size: 30 to 50 feet tall; 6 to 9 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late spring to Summer

To get the most bang for your buck and get it established quickly, go for crossvine. You’ll have billows of orange-red flowers for months at a time, and the vine can reach 30 feet in no time.


Cup and Saucer Vine/Cathedral Bells (Cobaea scandens)

USDA Growing Zones: 9 through 11

Size: 10 to 20 feet tall; 3 to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time:

South of zone 7, cup and saucer vine’s violet blooms attract bats as well as hummingbirds for a real boost to your garden wildlife. This is an extremely quick-growing plant; as an annual, it adds 10 to 20 feet per year. For more information, see the Missouri Botanical Garden profile [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=285443].


Cypress Vine (Ipomoea quamoclit)

USDA Growing Zones: 10 and 11 as perennials; 6 through 9 can be grown as self-seeding annuals

Size: 8 to 20 feet tall; 3 to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time: Summer through early fall

Cypress vine pairs trumpet-shaped red, white, or pink blooms with attractive feathery, fernlike foliage. The vine climbs, and the blooms, which close in the afternoon, will provide months of color during the hottest portion of the year. For more information, see the Missouri Botanical Garden profile [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=b912].


Daffodil (Narcissus)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall; 6 inches to 1.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Early to late spring

Daffodils are some of the earliest of spring’s flowers to open and greet the sun, and their cheery sunshine-yellow faces are bound to make you smile. Even better, despite their delicate appearance, daffodils are extraordinarily easy to grow.


Dahlia

USDA Growing Zones: 8 through 11 (or down to zone 3 as annuals)

Size: 1 to 6 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide 

Bloom Time: Midsummer to fall

Dahlias are an extremely broad category, with blooms in just about every shade with an array of shapes as well. They’re sure to add high drama to the garden, with most reaching between 4 and 5 feet tall topped with blooms that can measure up to 15 inches across.


Daisy (Bellis perennis)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 6 inches to 1 foot tall; 6 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summers

The English daisy is a low-growing groundcover dotted with classic daisy blooms. It’s a prolific spreader—so much so that some gardeners consider it invasive, so consider taking measures to contain it within the desired area.


Daylily (Hemerocallis)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9

Size: 1 to 5 feet tall; 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring to midsummer (though the “Very Late” variety bloom summer to early fall)

In addition to the classic apricot, daylilies come in cream, yellow, pink, blaze orange, brick red, and burgundy so deep it’s practically purple. Daylilies are popular because they provide gardeners with gorgeous flowers for years and years in exchange for very minimal care—they’re seriously low maintenance.


Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis)

USDA Growing Zones: 7B through 11

Size: 15 to 40 feet tall; 10 to 20 feet wide

Bloom Time: May to September

This desert tree is valuable in landscaping design for its showstopping blooms, each measuring an inch and a half long, which grow in clusters and resemble small pink lilies. It’s drought tolerant, making it an excellent choice for native plant gardens and xeriscape gardens or those who simply want a gorgeous tree for their yards. For more information, see the profile on Gardenia [https://www.gardenia.net/plant/chilopsis-linearis].


Dogwood Tree (Cornus)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8 (some varieties down to zone 2)

Size: 3 to more than 20 feet tall; 10 to 20 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring to summer

Dogwoods are popular with gardeners because of the variety of tree and shrub species there are to choose from. Dogwoods also grow quickly, adding more than a foot per year to their height.


Flowering Tobacco (Nicotiana alata)

USDA Growing Zones: 10 and 11 as a perennial (or as an annual in other zones)

Size: 1 to 5 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to first frost

Flowering tobacco is one of the most popular flowers for home gardeners because of its ease of care and showy, fragrant blossoms. In addition to bringing in hummingbirds, the blooms, which open in the evening, will also attract butterflies and birds.


Four o’ Clocks/Marvel of Peru (Mirabilis jalapa)

USDA Growing Zones: 7 through 10 as a perennial (as an annual in other zones)

Size: 2 to 3 feet tall and wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to first frost

Four o’clocks are a shrub-like flowering plant that, though a perennial, is often grown as an annual. The fragrant flowers open at night to attract butterflies as well as hummingbirds. Flowers in different shades may appear on the same plant, making for a colorful display. For more information read the profile on Missouri Botanical Garden [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=282898].


Foxglove (Digitalis)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 10

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Vertical spires are stacked with trumpet-shaped blooms on these old-fashioned flowers, which are available in an array of hues. Note that every part of the plant is poisonous to people and pets alike, so grow foxgloves away from areas where children or animals play.


Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellanica)

USDA Growing Zones: 10 and 11 (some varieties down to zone 6)

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Summer and fall

Fuchsias are humidity-loving plants that can grow as shrubs in beds or in container gardens. The blooms are truly gorgeous, with downward-facing magenta star-shaped blooms that open around a spiraled burgundy ruffle, with dramatic hot pink stamens spiking from the center.

For more information, read the profile on Missouri Botanical Garden [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=a511].


Geranium/Cranesbill (Pelargonium)

USDA Growing Zones: 10 and 11 as perennials (or as an annual in other zones)

Size: 4 inches to 4 feet tall, 6 inches to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through fall (although if the temperature stays above 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit—or 7.2 to 10 degrees Celsius—geraniums will continue to bloom through winter)

Geraniums are such popular flowers with gardeners because they’re so easy to care for and blossom for such a long period. And with all the available varieties of geranium out there, gardeners have an incredibly diverse selection of blossom color, shape, and size to choose from.


Gladiolus

USDA Growing Zones: 7 through 10 as perennials (or as an annual in other zones)

Size: 1.5 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Summer

For dramatic color in a swath of vertical spikes to contrast with your mounds of smaller flower, it’s hard to beat the classic gladiolus. In addition to adding beauty and charisma to the garden, gladioli are excellent in cut flower arrangements for their striking height.


Goldenrod (Solidago)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 3 inches to 7 feet tall, 3 inches to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time: End of summer to middle of fall (although certain varieties will continue blooming until the season’s first frost)

Add a golden haze to your garden as summer turns to fall by planting a stand of goldenrod. Goldenrod is a native American wildflower that’s just getting its start with home gardeners, who are loving the untamed, prairie-like beauty it adds to their flower beds and arrangements.


Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)

USDA Growing Zones: 9 through 11

Size: 3 to 10 feet tall, 3 to 8 feet wide

Bloom Time: Year round

Hibiscus plants are treasured for their dazzling tropical blooms, which in this variety are vivid red and can measure up to six inches across. In addition to attracting hummingbirds, the blossoms of the hibiscus plant will entice other beneficial pollinators, like butterflies and honeybees, to visit the garden. For more information, read our article How to Grow and Care for Your Hibiscus Plant [https://www.gardeningchannel.com/care-hibiscus-plant/].


Hollyhock (Alcea) 

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8

Size: 3 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Middle of summer to late summer

Hollyhocks are the epitome of cottage garden beauty, with their enormous blooms stacked vertically on towering spires. The tall stems are covered from tip to base in dinner-plate-sized blooms in shades of pale pink, fuchsia, burgundy so deep it is almost black, creamy yellow, white, purple, and even blue, with some two-toned varieties available.


Hydrangea

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9

Size: 1 to 20 feet tall, 2 to 12 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late spring to fall

It’s hard to beat the old-fashioned charm of hydrangeas. Many varieties of hydrangeas are one color when blossoms open, transforming to another shade as blooms get older and changing hues a third time as they near the end of their cycle.


Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) 

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 11

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Middle of summer to early fall

Hyssop is a semi-evergreen aromatic herb in the form of a semi-wood shrub that has glossy, dark green toothed leaves. From June to September, hyssop bursts into bloom with tubular purplish blue flowers that have two lips and dramatic stamens.


Impatiens/Bizzy Lizzy (Impatiens walleriana)

USDA Growing Zones: 2 through 11

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall, 6 inches to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Late spring to first frost

Impatiens are dependable little flowers that come in white, red, coral, fluorescent orange, lavender, and all hues of pink, from pale baby pink to dramatic magenta. Doubleblooming varieties with twice the petals stacked on each blossom are on the market as well.


Iris

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 10 in the west; 3 through 8 in the east

Size: 6 inches to 8 feet tall, 6 inches to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through fall (bloom time varies somewhat depending on variety)

The Easter garden feels incomplete without the traditional beauty of blue-purple irises or their less common cultivars in shades of yellow, rusty maroon, coral, pink, red, white, or combinations of two colors. The foliage is also quite striking, with lance-shaped spikes in shades of blue green to gray green.


Lantana (Lantana camara)

USDA Growing Zones: 7 through 11

Size: 6 inches to 8 feet tall, 1 to 4 feet wide

Bloom Time: July to first frost

Hummingbirds along with butterflies and honeybees flock to the tiny clustered blooms of lantana flowers, which come in shades of white, orange, red, pink, purple, and yellow. The flower clusters may be two-toned or mix different shades in the same grouping of continuously blooming flowers.


Larkspur (Delphinium)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 7

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer

The stacked spires of delphinium blossoms can range from pale baby blue to vivid bluebird and lavender shades with white centers all the way to indigo. They are also available in white, and one variety is white with a black center.These gorgeous plants can be somewhat fussy and do best in temperate climates when planted in soil that’s rich in organic material. For more information, read our article How to Grow Larkspur Flowers [https://www.gardeningchannel.com/how-to-grow-larkspur-flowers/].

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Lavender/English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) 

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 9

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall, 1 to 4 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to early fall

Lavender is a classic of the cottage garden, with tall grasslike foliage that buds into bloom with tiny blue-purple flowers clustered at the tips of each stem. The lavender plant is famous for its fresh, comforting scent, and many people grow lavender to use in sachets or so they can dry the blooms to use in potpourri.


Lilac (Syringa)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 7

Size: 3 to 30 feet tall, 3 to 20 feet wide (varies based on lilac variety)

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Lilac bushes burst in spring into a profusion of highly fragrant flower clusters in the classic shade of lavender or less common hues along the spectrum of  pink, purple, magenta, blue, or white. Some varieties have foliage that transforms in fall from its usual kelly green to blazing shades of orange, yellow, or deep red.


Lupine (Lupinus)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8 (some varieties up to zone 9A)

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 1.5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Lupine flowers are similar in shape to pea flowers and are stacked along the top of vertical stems of blue-green or gray-green foliage. The traditional shade is an indigo blue (as in the famous Texas Bluebonnet variety), but lupine flowers can also be salmon, red, fuchsia, purple, white, or yellow.


Morning Glory (Ipomoea)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 10

Size: 3 to 20 feet tall, 2 to 6 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to fall

The classic variety of morning glory is beloved for its blue blossoms, which open in the morning with vivid periwinkle faces that fade throughout the day, finally closing in the afternoon when they’re a pink-purple shade. The flowers appear on an evergreen vine with heart-shaped leaves that grows quickly, twining and climbing over trellises, walls, or any nearby structures. 


Moss Rose/Purslane (Portulaca)

USDA Growing Zones: 10B to 11 as a perennial (2 through 10A as an annual)

Size: 3 to 9 inches tall, 10 inches to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer to first frost

Moss rose flowers are extremely easy to grow for gardeners in hot, dry areas in a variety of soil types, and they’re free from most trouble with pests or diseases. The needle-shaped or teardrop-shaped creeping foliage is dotted with blossoms that resemble miniature roses in shades of pink, purple, red, peach, coral, yellow, and white. More than one color can appear on a plant, and some varieties have variegated blooms.


Nasturtium (Tropaeolum)

USDA Growing Zones: 9 through 11 as a perennial (as an annual in zones 4 through 8)

Size: 6 inches to 10 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Early summer to first frost

These edible flowers come in vivid shades of scarlet, buttery yellow, white and pink that give florid contrast to the gray-green foliage, with clumps of round leaves that resemble lily pads. Nasturtiums are often called upon in companion planting to function as trap plants for flea beetles, caterpillars, aphids, and whiteflies or to repel squash bugs. Make sure to pull up any sacrificial plants before insect eggs that have been laid on them will be ready to hatch.


Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 9

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 2 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: June to September

Obedient plant is a low maintenance flower for sunny spots that have acidic soil and plenty of drainage, and it will tolerate slightly wet ground or partial shade as well. The flower’s structure is similar to a snapdragon’s, with pale pink and white blooms surrounded by narrow, serrated jungle green leaves that make excellent cut flowers in arrangements. For more information, read the profile from Missouri Botanical Garden [http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=g620].


Oriental Poppy (Papaver orientale)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall, 4 inches to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Crepey scarlet petals with striking black centers float atop single stems, some varieties with zig-zaggy pinked edges and others with straight-edged ruffles. In addition to the traditional scarlet, you can also find Oriental poppies in pale salmon, pink, lavender, violet, orange, and white (with some two-toned varieties available, such as creamy white tinged with apricot).


Pansy (Viola tricolor var. hortensis) 

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8 as biennials (as annuals in zones 8 through 11)
Size: 6 inches to 1 foot tall, 4 inches to 1 foot wide

Bloom Time: Spring, fall, and winter

Pansies are known for the distinctive pattern in their blooms that some say resembles a face, and for blooming in both spring and fall, in many regions being one of the first flowers to open after the cold of winter. Pansies come in so many shades—yellow, magenta, purple, indigo, pink, coral, blue, red, rusty burnt orange, burgundy, and white.


Peony (Paeonia)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 8 

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 2 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring and summer

Peonies are perennials with gorgeous blossoms chock-full of petals in pink, purple, red, white, and yellow. Cared for well, peonies can last for decades, with some having lived to be 100.


Petunia 

USDA Growing Zones: 9 through 11 as perennials (or as annuals in other zones)

Size: 6 inches to 8 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: May to first frost

Petunias are one of the most popular plants for home gardeners, largely due to the enormous array of shades the blossoms can come in. Petunias are also appropriate for just about any spot in the garden, with some varieties creeping low to the soil as groundcovers while others seem designed to spill from baskets or grow into neat little mounds perfect for containers.


Pincushion Flower (Scabiosa)

USDA Growing Zones: 3 through 7

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall, 9 inches to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: April to first frost

This low-maintenance perennial has blossoms in uncommon shades for the garden: periwinkle blue, lavender, pink, white, and purple so deep it looks black. The frilly blooms attract lots of beneficial pollinators other than hummingbirds, including honeybees and butterflies.


Prickly Pear (Opuntia)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 9

Size: 6 —  to 15 feet tall and up to 6 feet wide—size fluctuates depending on the variety of prickly pear

Bloom Time: Summer

Prickly pear cactuses grow wild across many parts of the U.S., where their paddle-shaped sections covered in spines are a familiar sight along roadsides, in wild areas or cultivated gardens, and just about anywhere at all—these cacti are seriously tenacious and will flourish without the care of a gardener in spaces that would be uninhabitable for most plants. For more information, read the profile from University of California Small Farms [http://sfp.ucdavis.edu/pubs/brochures/Pricklypear/].


Purple Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 9

Size: 6 to 20+ feet tall, 3 to 30+ feet wide

Bloom Time: April to September

Passionflower is a vine with attractive, three-lobed leaves that uses its tendrils to climb, growing up to 15 to 20 feet in a single season. The unusual, dramatic blooms have geometric, 3-D stamens surrounded with frilly slivers of lavender, with larger petals supporting the whole bloom.


Red Hot Poker (Kniphofia)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 10

Size: 1 to 8 feet tall, 1 to 3 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through fall (Bloom period varies depending on variety)

The red hot poker plant got its name for its flowers, which grow on tall vertical spires topped with clusters of trumpet-shaped blooms in a gradient from red-orange at the tip down through coral and ending in yellow. These flowers have a small footprint for such high drama, making them a great choice for small-space gardens. For more information, read the profile from Missouri Botanical Garden [https://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=i310].


Rhododendron/Azalea

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 3 to 20 feet tall, 3 to 25 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through fall

Rhododendrons especially thrive in gardens that have acidic, rich soil when placed in a shady location. These shrubs grow quite large and can bring months’ worth of blooms to those tricky spots that can be hard to fill in the garden.


Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus)

USDA Growing Zones: 7 through 10 as a perennial (as an annual in other zones)

Size: 2 to 8 feet tall, 2 to 5 feet wide

Bloom Time: Spring through winter (Bloom time varies depending on variety)

Rosemary is one of the most useful herbs to grow for culinary use. The aromatic, woodsy flavor adds a whole new dimension to meat marinades, breads, roasted potatoes, roasted vegetables, and more.


Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans)

USDA Growing Zones: 5 through 9

Size: 8 to 40 feet tall, up to 30 feet wide

Bloom Time: Midsummer through fall

Nothing beats trumpet vine when it comes to climbing. However, this enthusiastic grower can multiply and grow so quickly that some gardeners consider it invasive. You may choose to keep your trumpet vine in a container, even if you bury the container to preserve the flower-bed look, to limit its spread to the area where you want it. Trumpet vine has been known to choke out plants nearby that aren’t as robust.


Verbena

USDA Growing Zones: 6 through 10

Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall, 1 foot to 20 inches wide

Bloom Time: Summer through fall

Verbenas add lots of color to the garden with their profusion of blooms, which come in shades of blue, coral, pink, purple, red, and white. Some types of verbena even have blooms that are striped or streaked, have white centers, or fringed edges for added drama.


Viburnum/European Cranberrybush (Viburnum opulus)

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 8 to 15 feet tall, 3 to 15 feet wide

Bloom Time: April and May

Viburnum spreads so vigorously that some gardeners consider it invasive, so you may decide to keep it in a container (even if the container is buried underground) to limit its spread. In addition to white or pink flowers, some varieties have foliage streaked with white or yellow, and those that do not have evergreen leaves turn blaze orange in the fall. Many types of viburnum also burst into cranberry-like fruits in the fall, making these bushes gorgeous all year long. For more information, read the profile on Missouri Botanical Garden.


Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica)

USDA Growing Zones: 3A to 9B

Size: 1 to 3 feet tall, 1 to 2 feet wide

Bloom Time: March and April

Virginia bluebells are one of the first flowers that emerge to greet the springtime sun. The flowers are pink when they first open from pink-colored buds, but they turn periwinkle blue as they develop.


Weigela

USDA Growing Zones: 4 through 8

Size: 3 to 4 feet

Bloom Time: End of summer to beginning of spring

Weigela is a blossom-packed shrub, traditionally with a profusion of pink tube-shaped flowers. Though several different varieties are available, most bloom in some shade of pink, from pale seashell pink to vibrant magenta, though one bush blooms in white. For more information, read the profile at Missouri Botanical Garden.


Zinnia

USDA Growing Zones: 2 through 11

Size: 6 inches to 4 feet

Bloom Time: midsummer to first frost

When it comes long-lasting blooms, you can’t beat zinnias, which will brighten the garden for up to six months at a time. There are so many colors to choose from with these low-maintenance plants.


As you can see, there’s an enormous array of flowers and flowering trees or shrubs to choose from that will bring hummingbirds flocking to your yard. Regardless of the zone you’re gardening in, you should have found plenty of choices to match your soil type, color scheme, and the type of plants you enjoy growing. As a bonus, most of the flowers on this list don’t just attract hummingbirds—they’ll bring in honeybees, butterflies, and other beneficial pollinators as well. Why not jot down a few of your favorites to add to your shopping list? Then you’ll be well on your way to making your garden more welcoming to hummingbirds and humans alike.

Learn More About Plants that Attract Hummingbirds

https://www.almanac.com/content/plants-attract-hummingbirds

https://bexar-tx.tamu.edu/homehort/archives-of-weekly-articles-davids-plant-of-the-week/plants-for-hummingbirds-and-butterflies/

https://www.birdsandblooms.com/birding/attracting-hummingbirds/annual-flowers-that-attract-hummingbirds/

https://www.birdsandblooms.com/gardening/plants-and-flowers-to-attract-hummingbirds/purple-flowers-that-attract-hummingbirds/

https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/lifestyle/4489359-ask-master-gardener-good-flowers-attract-hummingbirds

https://extension.unr.edu/publication.aspx?PubID=2135

https://hortnews.extension.iastate.edu/2000/6-9-2000/hummingbirds.html

https://www.hummingbirdcentral.com/attracting-hummingbirds-with-flowers.htm

http://www.hummingbirds.net/attract.html

https://www.plantdelights.com/blogs/articles/top-hummingbird-flower-plants-garden-hummingbirds-like

https://portlandnursery.com/natives/hummingbirds/

https://www.post-gazette.com/life/garden/2015/06/20/Gardening-Q-A-Flowers-to-attract-hummingbirds-to-your-garden/stories/201506210092

hummingbird feeding with text overlay flower gardening attract hummingbirds complete list of plants and flowers that attract hummingbirds

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